Uncle Mike Mahoney

'Uncle' Mike Mahoney - Mahoney’s Garden Centers

Have you’ve seen our herb and vegetable plants and wondered, “Who is Uncle Mike?” Uncle Mike is Michael Mahoney, one of the six second-generation Mahoneys. With a face full of beard and too-well-worn hat, Uncle Mike is a genuine down-to-earth guy.

With a passion for vegetable gardening Mike knows an astounding amount about organic and traditional gardening – tomatoes a specialty. Mike also possesses a wealth of information about plant care and plant care solutions. Uncle Mike is Mahoney’s “go-to” guy for advice about lawn care, including grass seeds and the rapidly expanding line of organic lawn products. And finally, Mike is deeply knowledgeable (and opinionated) about perennials.

 

Believe it or not, Mike started working in the family business at the impressionable (albeit illegal) age of 6. As with his other brothers and sisters, work and gardening was a part of life throughout their childhood. In high school Mike started a lawn mowing businesses to help pay for college. Mike graduated from Boston College with a degree in Fine Arts, and there was a time when Mike planned to move to New York City and pursue a career in art, but the family business won his heart in the end. Most days you’ll find Uncle Mike at the Mahoney’s in North Chelmsford, the store closest to his home in rural Townsend, and his wife and 3 children. When not at work, you’ll find Mike at home in his garden. “What better way to end a busy day then in the garden with a glass of cab or a bottle of fine ale.”

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